DACAmented Teachers

The Power of Your Presence

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Thoughts from A Corps Member

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Kareli Lizárraga
Colorado 2013
"As someone that has been an undocumented immigrant in the United States for the past 18 years, I am acutely aware of the obstacles that many of my students will have to face. I remember the uncertainty and even shame I felt while growing up, from being unable to open a bank account or get a license like the rest of my friends. From the constant threat of deportation to the crushingly limited access to higher education, I have faced the consequences of our parents attempting to forge a better future for us."

Teach For America Supports DACA

Frequently Asked Questions

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Teach For America is committed to accepting DACA recipients and doing everything we can to anticipate barriers and provide support, especially as new information becomes available from our current administration. Here is more about what we know.

Find additional information on how the DREAM Act and the BRIDGE Act relate to DACA. If you still have questions, reach out to the DACA Corps Member Support Team at DACASupport@teachforamerica.org

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program was established by President Obama via executive action in June 2012 to provide temporary relief from deportation and two-year work permits to qualified young adults who were brought to the United States as children. DACA unlocked countless economic opportunities for roughly 800,000 young people, 700,000 of whom are in the workforce and pay income taxes. In addition to providing work permits, DACA allows young immigrants to obtain driv
The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program was established by President Obama via executive action in June 2012 to provide temporary relief from deportation and two-year work permits to qualified young adults who were brought to...
The Trump administration is winding down DACA protections, though details on the process are not immediately clear. News reports indicate that new applications will not be processed, but that renewals will be processed for a limited time. This means existing work permits and protections will expire based on recipients’ renewal date, between 2018 and 2020.
The Trump administration is winding down DACA protections, though details on the process are not immediately clear. ...
The impact is devastating to our corps and the communities we serve. More than 190 corps members, alumni, and staff members will be among the 800,000 DACA recipients who will lose their work permits and be forced to live in the shadows to avoid deportation. As an organization, we will be forced to defer applicants with DACA status, and our undocumented students would lose a pathway to work legally.
The impact is devastating to our corps and the communities we serve. More than 190 corps members, alumni, and staff members will be among the 800,000 DACA recipients who will lose their work permits and be forced to live in the shadows to avoid deportation. As an organization, we will be forced to defer applicants with DACA status, and our undocumented students would lose a pathway to work...
The bipartisan DREAM Act of 2017. U.S. Senators Richard Durbin (D-Illinois) and Lindsey Graham (R-South Carolina) in July introduced the DREAM Act of 2017, seeking to create a pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants who know no other home than the United States. The legislation would provide permanent relief to recipients of the DACA program who will lose their right to work and protection from deportation because of Trump’s action. Durbin and Graham have also introduced an intermed
The bipartisan DREAM Act of 2017. U.S. Senators Richard Durbin (D-Illinois) and Lindsey Graham (R-South Carolina) in July introduced the DREAM Act of 2017, seeking to create a pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants who know no other home than the United States. The legislation would provide permanent relief to recipients of the DACA program who will lose their right to work and...
No matter your citizenship status, you must have at least a 2.50 undergraduate GPA and a bachelor’s degree by June to be a qualified candidate. At the time of your final interview, you must be able to provide proof of employment eligibility. As a DACA recipient, you must have a social security number and an Employment Authorization Document (EAD) to meet the hiring requirements of our partner schools.
No matter your citizenship status, you must have at least a 2.50 undergraduate GPA and a bachelor’s degree by June to be a qualified candidate. At the time of your final interview, you must be able to provide proof of employment eligibility. As a DACA recipient, you must have a social security number and an Employment Authorization Document (EAD) to meet the hiring requirements of our partner...
Not all of our regions can currently place DACA recipients because of hiring and certification requirements. If you are invited to attend a final interview, the Admissions Team will reach out to you with specific instructions on how to complete your Assignment Preference Form. While we do our best to place corps members in one of their highly preferred regions, we cannot guarantee it. We encourage you to be flexible when selecting your regional preferences.
Not all of our regions can currently place DACA recipients because of hiring and certification requirements. If you are invited to attend a final interview, the Admissions Team will reach out to you with specific instructions on how to complete your Assignment Preference Form. While we do our best to place corps members in one of their highly preferred regions, we cannot guarantee it. We...
While there is no guarantee that any corps member will receive an AmeriCorps education award, the funding is only granted to U.S. citizens, nationals, or permanent residents. DACA recipients are not eligible to receive AmeriCorps benefits. For the 2016 corps year, ultimately all corps members were able to receive the AmeriCorps education award despite reduced Congressional appropriations for AmeriCorps, and we were also able to grant the equivalent of the AmeriCorps education award to all DACA r
While there is no guarantee that any corps member will receive an AmeriCorps education award, the funding is only granted to U.S. citizens, nationals, or permanent residents. DACA recipients are not eligible to receive AmeriCorps benefits. For the 2016 corps year, ultimately all corps members were able to receive the AmeriCorps education award despite reduced Congressional appropriations for...
You will be able to apply for need-based transitional grants and loans at two points: After you receive an invitation to a final interview. After being admitted to the corps. The Corps Member Finances team will be able to help you apply for funding.
You will be able to apply for need-based transitional grants and loans at two points: After you receive an invitation to a final interview. After being admitted to the corps. The Corps Member Finances team will be able to help you apply for...
If your Employment Authorization Document is set to expire during your two-year commitment to the corps, we will provide the appropriate legal assistance to ensure you are able to apply for a renewal. It will be your responsibility to work with your regional staff and contact our Legal Affairs team about the schedule, making sure our legal team has enough time to work on the necessary steps for renewal. As a corps member, you will be responsible for paying the government processing costs for the
If your Employment Authorization Document is set to expire during your two-year commitment to the corps, we will provide the appropriate legal assistance to ensure you are able to apply for a renewal. It will be your responsibility to work with your regional staff and contact our Legal Affairs team about the schedule, making sure our legal team has enough time to work on the necessary steps for...
The DREAM Act of 2017 is bipartisan legislation that allows certain individuals brought to the U.S. as children to obtain lawful permanent residence and eventually American citizenship if they: Are longtime residents who came to the U.S. as children; Graduate from high school or obtain a GED; Pursue higher education, work lawfully for at least three years, or serve in the military; Pass security and law enforcement background checks and pay a reasonable application fee; Demonstrate proficiency i
The DREAM Act of 2017 is bipartisan legislation that allows certain individuals brought to the U.S. as children to obtain lawful permanent residence and eventually American citizenship if they: Are longtime residents who came to the U.S. as children; Graduate from high school or obtain a GED; Pursue higher education, work lawfully for at least three years, or serve in the military; Pass security...

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Creating Safe Spaces

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