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With A Brooklyn Accent Blog

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

In this video, Mark Naison misinterprets our mission and inaccurately describes the impact of our corps members and alumni. Here are the facts:

  • Our role is to develop leaders both inside and outside of education who are committed to expanding opportunity for every student, starting with teaching for at least two years in an underserved urban or rural school. Eighty-six percent of our alums work in education or with low-income communities.
  • Nearly two-thirds of our alumni are working full-time in education, including 10,000 who are teaching in K-12 classrooms and 100 who serve as elected union leaders.
  • We're one of the country's largest sources of African American and Latino teachers. Fifty-four percent of the 2013 corps grew up in a low-income community or identify as people of color:

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  • We have previously addressed the inaccurate characterizations of our work in Chicago and Newark. In Philadelphia, fiscal constraints over the past several years have led to a dramatic reduction in the number of teaching positions in district schools, including those held by corps members and alumni. The bottom line is that our corps members are subject to the same hiring practices as any other beginning teacher.
  • We're proud of the work our corps members and alumni are doing, but we're also committed to continually improving our program. For example, we're launching a series of programs this summer to enhance the ongoing support we provide to alumni teachers, including coaching opportunities and teacher practice communities.